PRS Asia

 

The Practice Research Symposium in Asia features Higher Degree by Research examinations, candidate presentations, a keynote lecture and various social functions associated with the symposium.

PhD candidates from RMIT’s School of Architecture and Urban Design, School of Media and Communication, and School of Design present at each PRS, creating a cohort of distinguished practitioners operating within the Asia Pacific region whose research reflects the unique practices of this diverse and dynamic ecology. 

To join our mailing list please contact prs_asia@rmit.edu.au.





Abstract Book and Program


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View Abstracts September 2019


Weekend Program



PhD Examinations

RUI LEAO

Designing by Increments: opportunistic planning as urban strategy for Macau

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Thursday 19 September 2019 10am – 12pm
Venue: Osage Gallery
4/F, Union Hing Yip Factory Building,
20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Examiners: Prof Fei Che, Prof Hae-Won Shin
Chair: Dr Roger Kemp
Supervisors: Prof Sand Helsel, Dr Anna Johnson

I am an agent of change, a negotiator and a policy-maker; I explore an expanded field for the architect through an engagement in negotiation and agency with government bodies to achieve meaningful urban changes through design – an important role that architects can play in changing both the culture of projects’ commission and the spatial propositions for the future city of Macau.
Due to the specific projects that we designed over the years, and my propensity to expand the scope of architectural design, my work reflects the relevance of infrastructure in the design of the city and exemplifies how infrastructural urbanism can complement conventional urbanism by using the infrastructure to generate public spaces. This contribution is attained through a systematic opportunistic stance where I play various roles to enact scenarios of discussion with all stakeholders, resulting in innovative procurement strategies.

My contribution resides in practicing resilient infrastructural, incremental and civic urbanism as an alternative form of practice. I use every project as an opportunity to test my urban visions, by inserting additional layers into the projects and creatively widening the scope of the original briefs, offering more to the city than just the initial formal and programmatic intent.




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CARLOTTA BRUNI

Shaping Macau’s Unpurposed Space: Design in Context

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Thursday 19 September 2019 2.30pm – 4.30pm
Venue: Osage Gallery
4/F, Union Hing Yip Factory Building,
20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Examiners: Prof Fei Che, Prof Hae-Won Shin
Chair: Dr Roger Kemp
Supervisors: Prof Sand Helsel, Dr Richard Black

My practice based research is based on two premises: on the observation of my context: the morphology of the urban space and its use; and on the development of architectural strategies in response to tangible local urban issues, such as density, profit driven urban development and new infrastructure in the city. The physical context of the research is Macau, and the architectural strategies are observed on the work of a shared practice, LBA Architecture and Planning of over 20 years.
I investigate common and social spaces, and how the connecting tissue of the city, streets or corridors, can be transformed into intermediate free spaces.
The research led to the discovery of the idea of un-purposed space: a breathing compositional element that has been introduced at several scales in my projects, from interior design to infrastructure.

Un-purposed space is the designer’s addition to the building program, a gift. It adds new layers of community interaction and cultural use to the overall design. It stems from the generosity that is at the core of the architectural agenda, when we architects are able to address not only the client’s desires but also our own agendas in response to inherent urban issues, our civic responsibility.




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Olivier OttEvaere

Concrete Approximations: Material Responsiveness for an Augmented Experience of Space

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Friday 20 September 2019 10am – 12pm
Venue: Osage Gallery
4/F, Union Hing Yip Factory Building,
20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Examiners: Prof Hilary French, Prof Richard Goodwin
Chair: Prof Martyn Hook
Supervisors: Prof Sand Helsel, Dr Anna Johnson

Through the lens of a specific material, concrete, and the interaction with its active properties, this research focuses on alternative procedures of construction that challenge typical generic forms of building, such as the general column-slab system, now ubiquitous across all building scales and cultures, which originated from the Dom-ino house (Domus-Innovation) by Le Corbusier.

In developing unique methods of fabrication, the aim is to create designs that have the potential to impact and influence the monotony of mainstream construction systems, whilst offering a design process that works with inventive incremental prototyping procedures, which test and explore the relationship between material, formwork and spatial consequences strategically and across a range of scales. Each design is considered as a prototype that adheres to the limitations of material and structural logics, as a productive space for design-research innovations.



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Tobias Klein

Through the Looking Glass: a synthetic model of techne and poesis in
collaborative Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Friday 20 September 2019 2.30pm – 4.30pm
Venue: Osage Gallery
4/F, Union Hing Yip Factory Building,
20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Examiners: Prof Hilary French, Prof Richard Goodwin
Chair: Prof Martyn Hook
Supervisors: Prof Sand Helsel, Dr Anna Johnson, A/Prof Harald Kraemer

This research establishes an operational synthesis between digital and physical materials and tools as poetic (Poïesis) and technical (Technê) expressions as a new hybrid practice model. My practice model opposes a traditional dualistic separation of digital work-flows and traditional making and material understanding. I bring forward three operational methods, (modi operandi) to define a practice model able to overcome the fifteenth- and sixteenth-century schism of intellectual from manual labour, as well as the nineteenth-century gulf between automatic mechanization and poetic creation. The first articulates the Transfer of physical traces into digital environments and reversely fitting digital objects into the narratives and values of cultural artefacts. Antithetical to the first method, a Transformation formulates an emancipation of transferred data through materialising transformations in constructed cultural contexts.

This research is able to synthesise the previous dialectics, articulating the notion of a Digital Craftsmanship in the form of a collaborative practice in which methods of transfer and transformation collapse into a dialogue of practitioners from craft, science and engineering, enabling the emergence of new hybrid objects, materials, tools and associated values, narratives and cultural contexts.



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