PRS Australia 

The Practice Research Symposium (PRS) features public examinations and progress review presentations by Higher Degree by Research candidates in RMIT’s School of Architecture and Urban Design.

Public examinations and progress reviews by PhD candidates working across the disciplines of architecture, industrial design, interior design, landscape architecture and spatial information architecture will be held at the PRS from 31 May to 3 June 2018.

All events will be held at RMIT Design Hub, Building 100, corner Swanston and Victoria Streets, Melbourne (unless otherwise stated).


PRS EVENTS

Lecture by Prof Felicity D. Scott, Columbia University - A Straighter Kind of Hip
Thursday 31 May, 6.30 - 7.30pm in 80.01.002 (SAB) Read more

PRS launch and drinks Opening of exhibits with book launches and special performances
Friday 1 June, 5 -7pm in Project Rooms 1 and 2, Level 2 Read more

Candidate and Supervisor Cocktail Kickstarter Forum  - Feedback & Complexity in Practice Research
Saturday 2 June, 5.30 – 6.40pm in Lecture Theatre, level 3 Read more 

Cocktail Party (RSVP only)
Saturday 2 June, 6:45 - 8:30pm in Long Room, Level 10

Research Compendium Workshop - led by Kathy Waghorn, University of Auckland
 Sunday 3 June, 12 - 1 pm in Pavilion 1, Level 10 Read more


PhD EXAMINATIONS

KRISTOF CROLLA

Building Simplexity: The 'More or Less' of Post-Digital Architecture Practice

Thursday 31 May 10am - 12pm
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub

More
CORBETT LYON

OUTSIDE, INSIDE AND THE IN-BETWEEN; A Journey Through the Design Terrains of the Design Practitioner

Thursday 31 May 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub

More
MANUEL MUEHLBAUER

Typogenetic Design - Aesthetic Decision Support for Architectural Shape Generation

Thursday 31 May 2:30pm-4:30pm
Project Room 2, RMIT Design Hub

More
MICHAEL LAVERY

engaging objects

Friday 1 June 10am - 12pm
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub

More
TANYA COURT

The Site Re-presented: Everyday Civic Landscapes

Friday 1 June 10am - 12pm
Project Room 2, RMIT Design Hub

More
CAREY LYON

Design by Discourse

Friday 1 June 3:00pm - 5:00pm (note: non-standard time)
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub

More
 
JENNY GRIGG

Material Literacy: The Significance of Materials in Graphic Design Ideation, a Practice-Based Enquiry

Friday 1 June 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Project Room 2, RMIT Design Hub

More
 

KRISTOF CROLLA
Building Simplexity: The 'More or Less' of Post-Digital Architecture Practice

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Thursday 31 May 10am - 12pm
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub 

Chair: Pia Ednie-Brown
Examiners: Jonas Runberger, Drew Williamson
Supervisors: Charles Anderson, Jane Burry 

A strong dichotomy exists between the increased architectural design agency offered by digital tools today and the affordances given by many construction contexts, especially building environments in developing countries with limited available means. This creative practice research project postulates that by incorporating incertitude as a productive and constructive component in alternative computation-driven design and materialisation processes, the locally available solution space for built architecture can be dramatically expanded and onsite ability and agency increased.

The study develops methods that procedurally manage slippage from aleatory occurrences during materialisation and transform it into a practical opportunity for non-standard project realisation. Protean design diagrams, capable of absorbing serendipity throughout the project crystallisation process, give uncertainty room to feed back into the system, providing rigour and animus to the whole. Thus, fluctuations are embraced as the design develops into its final singular site-specific solution.

The project constellation demonstrates that identified methods can substantially increase the architects’ agency and local onsite affordance. In doing so, the case is made for more democratic epistemic models and more intelligent structures of approximation than (common) deterministic approaches in digital design would allow for, and insight is provided into the extent to which computation can further impact architectural practice.

CORBETT LYON
OUTSIDE, INSIDE, AND THE IN-BETWEEN; A Journey Through the Design Terrains of the Design Practitioner

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Thursday 1 June 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub

Chair: Paul Minifie
Examiners: Catherin Bull, Geoffrey London
Supervisors: Leon van Schaik, Paul Carter

This project explores the relationships between a designer's personal history and spatial intelligence, design thinking and practice, and built work.

The project seeks to discover distinguishing attributes and 'genetic' markers in the author’s work which provide clues to the works’ making. Records of design thinking and practice, observed from the privileged viewpoint of the mental space of the designer and captured in real time, offer insights into ‘design in action’.

Each of these three terrains – personal history/spatial intelligence, design thinking and practice, and built work – are initially explored independently. This exploration is followed by an analysis identifying interlinking threads across the three terrains, highlighting discovered interdependencies and affinities.

MANUEL MUEHLBAUER
Typogenetic Design - Aesthetic Decision Support for Architectural Shape Generation

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Thursday 31 May 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Project Room 2, RMIT Design Hub

Chair: Mick Douglas
Examiners: Jonas Runberger, Leon Sterling
Supervisors: Marcelo Stamm, Jane Burry, Andy Song

Typogenetic Design is an interactive computational design system combining generative design, evolutionary search and architectural optimisation technology. The active tool for supporting design decisions during architectural shape generation uses an aesthetic system to guide the search process. This aesthetic system uses intelligent control to direct the search process toward preferences expressed interactively by the designer.

An image input as design reference is integrated by means of shape comparison to provide direction to the exploratory search. During the shape generation process, the designer can choose solutions interactively in a graphical user interface. Those choices are then used to support the selection process as part of the fitness function by online classification.

Enhancing human decision making capabilities in human-in-the-loop design systems addresses the complexity of architecture in respect to aesthetic requirements. On the strength of machine learning, the integral performance trade-off during multi-criteria optimisation was extended to address aesthetic preferences. The tacit knowledge and subjective understanding of designers can be used in the shape generation process based on interactive mechanisms. As a result, an integrated support system for performance-based design was developed and tested.

MICHAEL LAVERY
Engaging Objects

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Friday 1 June 10am - 12pm
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub 

Chair: Leon van Schaik
Examiners: Nigel Bertram, Felicity Scott
Supervisors: Vivian Mitsogianni, Michael Spooner

I find ideas, emotions, and engaging moments, lie hidden in the objects which surround a project, waiting to be; discovered, connected and expressed in my work. This study articulates the ways in which I do this, my contribution to the 'object' in architecture, and the ways which architecture can engage.

TANYA COURT
The Site Re-presented: Everyday Civic Landscapes

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Friday 1 June 10am - 12pm
Project Room 2, RMIT Design Hub

Chair: Suzie Attiwill
Examiners: Catherine Dung, Ian Weir
Supervisors: Richard Black, Michael Trudgeon, SueAnne Ware

The Site Re-presented: Everyday Civic Landscapes is an attempt to newly redefine the potential of a public realm designed for everyday encounters of a diverse, constantly shifting contemporary demographic. Everyday Civic Landscapes can engage, involve, enrich and provoke a new self-consciousness and responsibility for creating what is civic for its time. It is the qualities of this involvement of people with sites that contributes to a reconsideration of the civic.

CAREY LYON
Design by Discourse

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Friday 1 June 3:00pm - 5:00pm (note: non-standard time)
Project Room 1, RMIT Design Hub

Chair: Leon van Schaik
Examiners: Geoffrey London, Felicity Scott
Supervisors: Vivian Mitsogianni, Paul Carter

Talk, and other forms of discursiveness in my design processes, are proposed as a primary means of making architecture, different to the conventions of design by drawing. This includes talking about, and talking through architecture, but also where the architecture itself talks back. Such a discursive model allows the reframing of my design approach as an opening up of a series of enquiries – with clients, within my mind, within the practice of Lyons, with questions around the public and community, and directly with the design process itself. These discursive explorations create varied fields of enquiry, each of which overlap, blend and interconnect. From this overlapping, the process becomes one of developing a design out of its accumulated entanglement. This then becomes another proposition in which such discursive intricacies of talk become directly embedded into completed designs through what I have termed the discursive object. Projects take on the same character of openness as the process itself, and equally remain as an open question or enquiry and an expression of the inclusionary and the multiple.

JENNY GRIGG
Material Literacy: The Significance of Materials in Graphic Design Ideation, a Practice-Based Enquiry

Please arrive 15 minutes early to exam as no late entry.

Friday 1 June 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Project Room 2, RMIT Design Hub 

Chair: Mick Douglas
Examiners: Andrew Morrison, Gavin Sade
Supervisors: Harriet Edquist, Brad Haylock (joint)

The aim of this research is to reveal the significance of materiality in graphic design ideation. It argues that materials are active participants in the generation of graphic design ideas. While prevalent in the discourse of disciplines such as architecture, this mode of design enquiry is relatively unresearched in graphic design. A multimodal, visual methodology has been designed to hybridise practice-based research with collective case- study research. Framed by a reflection on the topic in my practice, a comparative study is made of materiality in the ideation of another graphic design practitioner, David Lancashire. The basis of these studies is my collection of processual artefacts and artefacts from Lancashire’s design archive. Analysis of these retrieves aspects of tacit design knowledge that is intrinsic to the construction of each. The most significant contribution of the research is the introduction of the concept of ‘material literacy’. The thesis argues that because graphic communications are contingent on material circumstances, materials themselves provide a language that is available for infinite interpretation.